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-   -   Heating issues? (http://www.slednutz.com/showthread.php?t=6792)

Gotmud 01-01-2014 11:07 AM

Heating issues?
 
Ok so I seem to remember Rubi complaining about the temps he saw on his Pro. I'm curious Rubi if you are still seeing high temps and just how high they are? Flatty, anyone in your group have high heat issues? Gerbs have you ridden enough to see what temps you were running?

On the trail in the Snowies my temps were getting dangerous and I've never had issues like that. 188 degrees was the highest I saw, it actually shut my sled down as I was flying down the trail. I pulled the panels and checked the plugs assuming the worse. Plugs were nasty so I put new ones in and it did start and run great once changed. The temp never got above 155 degrees after that but if I saw 150 I'd slow down and dive off trail. I have just past 2000 miles and slightly nervous the high temps could mean my pistons are getting sloppy as Polaris's newer powerplants and known for. Compression is just over 120psi on both cylinders. A little nervous and figured I'd ask what temps you guys consistently see? Off trail my temps are normally between 120-135. On trail I'm used to seeing 148 for a high temp. Got a little nervous when temps spiked over 150 which was every time we got on a trail. Now on one trail ride back to the cabin I leaded and hauled ass going very fast, riding on the trail like Zeezletitties it didn't even come close to overheating. ???

The Gerbil 01-01-2014 12:09 PM

I haven't had any major heating issues with mine yet. The warmest I have seen it get is about 155 and that is riding through town to get to the trail otherwise it stays in the mid to high 120's when riding in decent snow.

OCR 01-01-2014 03:56 PM

Mud, if you are seeing those kinds of temps on hardpack then you should add some scratchers.

Rubi 01-01-2014 08:38 PM

The Pro is a joke on anything but the deep snow it's made for. I have to put the scratchers down even on soft, loose-snow trails if there isn't any good snow to pull off into. My 600 Pro started to overheat in 2" of fresh powder. If you're in a slow uphill climb like going up to Spring Creek where you're not traveling fast enough for the scratchers to work, sometimes I have to pull off and throw some snow on the tunnel. Going to Spring Creek, I can usually make it to the first tiny clearing above the aspen trees before I hit 175 degrees. A solid braap in that 150 foot clearing cools it off enough to get to the next clearing. In more open trails like we might travel in Island Park, the scratchers keep it cool because we're riding fast enough for the scratchers to work.

Now when we're talking "overheating" it seems to be a relative thing. I start to freak out when my digital gauge says 160 because in deep snow it runs at 126 degrees all day long. But 160 isn't that hot. Neither is 180. I think limp mode sets in when you hit one ninety something, and that's probably because they want you to shut down 20 degrees before real damage occurs. Why should a sled run at 125 degrees is my question. That seems awful cold to me. Little too hot for a hot tub, but most people drink their coffee hotter. Doesn't a car run at 200 or 205? Why does a sled need to be so much colder? This season I'm going to be calmer about it when my sled wants to run in the 160's. I'll continue to take special care to avoid the cold shock though.

I'm pretty sure you just ran into some snow conditions that were different and made the sled run hotter. If a few miles of trail got 3:00 sun, and then it got shady, it could be enough to make the snow not fly in your tunnel as much as it was before. When I'm riding the spots I usually ride, I know where I might overheat, and I always know the spot where it will get better, or where I can get into the deep snow. If there's something wrong with your engine, it would overheat in the deep snow too.

Gotmud 01-01-2014 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OCR (Post 126446)
Mud, if you are seeing those kinds of temps on hardpack then you should add some scratchers.

I've had the sled for 4 years and never seen temps like that. I've never needed scratchers because there has never been a heating issue.

Now I did also learn where to cool it off when it got hot on the trail. Ratstang said it could have been the perfectly groomed trail, which they seemed fresh groomed every trail ride to and from. When tooling along an ungroomed trail that was tracked up there was never an issue. I was normally in powder any other time and obviously didn't have any issues at that time either. For now I'm blaming it on the overly groomed trail, but slightly worried its a sign the engine is about to give. I did hammer on it for 2 days after the overheat though, hopefully I'm just worried about nothing lol.

Rubi 01-01-2014 09:52 PM

I guess Riley lost a cylinder from overheating, but that was from kids at some training program riding it around a parking lot with a wheel kit at 55 degrees. I guess he had one cylinder down 15 psi, and he lost about 400 RPM on top after that.

I had my Boonditcher so hot this year that the motor kept running after I shut it off and pulled off BOTH plug wires! She fired right back up after I filled the whole coolant system back up. A gallon and a half got me 8 blocks to my house from Gerbil's. I guess if a head bolt is stripped your coolant all comes out. Who knew??

My only question Mud, is if the sled runs at the same temperature it always did when you're in decent snow conditions, why do you think it is a symptom of a larger problem? If you've got other problems, it would run too hot all the time.

Powersledder 01-02-2014 09:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gotmud (Post 126452)
I've had the sled for 4 years and never seen temps like that. I've never needed scratchers because there has never been a heating issue.

Global warming! You're starting to see the effects now.




Quote:

Originally Posted by Rubi (Post 126449)
The Pro is a joke on anything but the deep snow it's made for. I have to put the scratchers down even on soft, loose-snow trails if there isn't any good snow to pull off into. My 600 Pro started to overheat in 2" of fresh powder. If you're in a slow uphill climb like going up to Spring Creek where you're not traveling fast enough for the scratchers to work, sometimes I have to pull off and throw some snow on the tunnel. Going to Spring Creek, I can usually make it to the first tiny clearing above the aspen trees before I hit 175 degrees. A solid braap in that 150 foot clearing cools it off enough to get to the next clearing. In more open trails like we might travel in Island Park, the scratchers keep it cool because we're riding fast enough for the scratchers to work.

Now when we're talking "overheating" it seems to be a relative thing. I start to freak out when my digital gauge says 160 because in deep snow it runs at 126 degrees all day long. But 160 isn't that hot. Neither is 180. I think limp mode sets in when you hit one ninety something, and that's probably because they want you to shut down 20 degrees before real damage occurs. Why should a sled run at 125 degrees is my question. That seems awful cold to me. Little too hot for a hot tub, but most people drink their coffee hotter. Doesn't a car run at 200 or 205? Why does a sled need to be so much colder? This season I'm going to be calmer about it when my sled wants to run in the 160's. I'll continue to take special care to avoid the cold shock though.

I'm pretty sure you just ran into some snow conditions that were different and made the sled run hotter. If a few miles of trail got 3:00 sun, and then it got shady, it could be enough to make the snow not fly in your tunnel as much as it was before. When I'm riding the spots I usually ride, I know where I might overheat, and I always know the spot where it will get better, or where I can get into the deep snow. If there's something wrong with your engine, it would overheat in the deep snow too.

From what I've seen, there are a lot of 2-stroke engine builders that do not want their engines get above 140-150 and 160 is the shut down limit. my thoughts on this is either they are running really tight piston wall clearances or they are worried about overheating the fuel charge as it works it's way through the ports. When I had my PSI I was told it needs to run right around 140.

Rubi 01-02-2014 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Powersledder (Post 126459)
Global warming! You're starting to see the effects now.
From what I've seen, there are a lot of 2-stroke engine builders that do not want their engines get above 140-150 and 160 is the shut down limit. my thoughts on this is either they are running really tight piston wall clearances or they are worried about overheating the fuel charge as it works it's way through the ports. When I had my PSI I was told it needs to run right around 140.

That's kind of along the lines I was thinking when trying to figure reasons they wanted them to run cool. Then I thought that as long as the cold air was coming from outside, the velocity of the air would prevent it from being heated enough to make it significant. I wonder how much a 40 degree difference in coolant temperature actually effects the temperature inside the cylinder. If it has a big effect, maybe we should all run as much coolant capacity of Ibreakstuff?

flatlander_summit 01-02-2014 05:27 PM

I've seen a lot of 125-145 on the trails, I think the warmest I've had mine is in the 150s. You're right about limp mode, it's in the 190s or 200.

I don't know if I'd worry about it. I know there are guys in my group who have run their sleds warmer than that on a consistent basis.

One thing I noticed is last year when I went to the 5.1 track instead of the competition track my sled ran warmer on the trails. Before I changed tracks I rarely ran with my scratchers down, now I have to on the trail with the 5.1. There are 6 or 7 pros in my immediate group of riding partners and we all run scratchers down most of the time on the trail.

Gotmud 01-02-2014 08:58 PM

I've been told Poo shuts down at 190 degrees to save the engine from any damage. That could also be a reason it shut down. I'll keep a close eye on my temps for now.

Gotmud 01-08-2014 07:31 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Problem found? Changing my clutching back to sea level today. Primary spring was broken. Helix has marks and the roller is pretty worn on the side with the worn ramp. I'm thinking that would be enough drag to make my sled overheat on a groomed trail while cruising? Remember I had no heat issues when I was racing on the trail like Dick Trickle.:sexyt:

What do you think?

Powersledder 01-09-2014 08:55 AM

Overworking the engine could build a lot more heat pretty easily.

Gotmud 01-09-2014 09:37 AM

^^ So it would cause enough drag to raise my temps?

Rubi 01-09-2014 09:45 AM

Why would bad clutches overheat the sled on the trail? Proper clutching is way more important in deep snow where there is a lot of drag on the sled.

Dirty_Harry 01-09-2014 11:10 AM

Time for a new sled? I hear the Arctic Cats are super reliable from the get go. Ratstang?

:poosy:

Ibreakstuff 01-09-2014 11:44 AM

I wouldn't think that sloppy pistons or clutching issues to be enough to overheat it. Remember, I am the overheating master lol.

Gotmud 01-09-2014 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rubi (Post 126569)
Why would bad clutches overheat the sled on the trail? Proper clutching is way more important in deep snow where there is a lot of drag on the sled.

Steady cruising would ride the roller in the center of the ramp, that's where the damage is. I guess I just thought that friction on one half of the clutch fighting the other may put a slight drag on the engine? The broken primary spring I don't think would overheat it but the secondary dragging I could see.

Not a big fan of TacoHell anyways Bryan. Ever since the whole "real" meat thing, they skeer me lol.

Student Driver 01-10-2014 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OCR (Post 126446)
Mud, if you are seeing those kinds of temps on hardpack then you should add some scratchers.

exactly

Gotmud 01-14-2014 08:13 AM

In the 4 years I've had the sled that is the ONLY time its happened. I've never needed it before this, something was wrong. I just played in the Yoop for 3 days and saw 156 as the highest temp. This is not normal for MY snowmobile. Hopefully it was a fluke and its over now.


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